Tag Archives: horror

Remember when there was just one Alien?

Juggling several games at once, like I constantly do, means you have more chances of rediscovering stuff you bought (or maybe even got for free) ages ago and never played. One such game is Alien Versus Predator, one of the most famous among those featuring the Xenomorphs – and the Predators too, of course, but there are many more games about the Alien whereas the hunter creature never really got anything aside maybe from Predator: Concrete Jungle (another game currently in my waitlist). And as it usually happens with very old stuff, 18 years old in this case, what you discover is not quite the same as people saw it upon release.

The Marine campaign would be much more tense, if it weren’t almost arcade in nature.

They said it was scary. Well, people also found The Exorcist horrifying in 1973, so I guess standards do change. But even so, I was never really afraid of peeking behind a corner. Perhaps the biggest problem was, even if an Alien had been hiding there, I could just blast its face full of lead. At worst its acidic blood splurts would take out maybe 15% of my armor, top. Not so scary then, is it? Enemies respawn, which means you can never truly feel safe, but it’s also easy to predict where the developers are going to spawn an Alien, so you are always ready. Except for the face-huggers. Those things were really annoying.

The Predator campaign is a bit like playing Crysis in 1999: you get the coolest weapons, a cloaking ability, your energy recharges with time, and the graphics hurt your eyes.

This was arguably a problem with old games in general. Can’t really see people getting scared by Alone in the Dark or Resident Evil today, aside from a couple of scripted sequences – which brings me to my point: scripting. In the end, is it only possible to do horror in games by carefully constructing everything in advance? The success of Outlast, so hollywoodian in nature, would make you think so. Even earlier games like Penumbra and Amnesia, though less restrictive, still relied for the most part on scripted events. Heck, the most memorable parts of the aforementioned fathers of survival horror are still the scripted scenes, like the dog monster breaking into the house from the window in RE1, or… the dog monster breaking into the house from the window in AITD. Yeah, I can see a pattern here.

The Alien campaign sometimes reminds you of the more colorful Rayman 2.

I can’t think of many ways of doing horror without carefully setting up a specific scene for the player to stumble upon. Certain titles like Silent Hill and Forbidden Siren were a bit creepier all around, but even in those games you are on the edge of your seat precisely because you don’t know when the next scripted scare will come up. I so, however, remember the NY Tenements level in Shadow Man, where somehow I was scared all the way through, even though nothing happened. Now I know this, it’s not scary anymore, but the first time it worked well. Is it possible then, to do horror without scripting? Perhaps so, but just like scripted horror, it would lack replayability.

I don’t actually remember what I wanted to say anymore, so nevermind. As it stands, AVP1 was fun but flawed, and certtainly not that scary. From what I know, when Monolith developed AVP2, they dropped the randomized nature in favor of the Valve-esque route of scripted events. So maybe it will be more horror in nature. I’ll know soon: the game itself is not available on any download service, but I still have the disc, and it seems to work fairly well on Windows 10 too. We’ll see if a scripted scare is more effective than Aliens coming out of the goddamn walls.

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Barrow Hill: The Dark Path – Night of the Offering Redux

I’ve made no secret of my love for niche horror adventures. I don’t know what it is that attracts me to them – maybe the obtuse puzzles, or the totally corny voice acting, or the nice art that still relies on point and click screens. I’ve been playing these things since the original Dark Fall. Although, it wasn’t always such a great time: Dark Fall was a bit too complicated. Rhiannon was a screen-hunting mess (in a real nice setting though). The Lost Crown was really good, but perhaps too long. Barrow Hill was one of the most interesting titles, but suffered from a pretty hard big puzzle near the end. So how does its sequel fare?

(spoilers ahead)

tdp4
“I thought I was rid of Emma Harry and her crazy spirits forever. But now I know I must go… BACK TO THE HILL!” *theme music*

The plot is not too different from the first game. It’s still the Equinox, some kids are still stupid enough to go around meddling with vengeful spirits, and you gotta save everyone. While it does feel like a retread, even down to the puzzles progression, enough has been changed to make the experience feel fairly fresh.

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Oh, looks like the victims from the first game got some mourning from their families. Finally someone who cares about disappeared NPCs.

The big problem in horror adventures is often how difficult and obtuse the puzzles are. Finding some of the ingredients in Barrow Hill was outright devilish. Dark Path tries to solve this issue by hinting at solutions a bit more heavily, especially if you enable item descriptions from the options. The three big puzzles to end the game – find the kids’ personal items to free them, find the metals to destroy the circle, and get some substitute items to replace Baibin’s – are almost all fairly obvious. This does make the game a lot less frustrating as you are generally able to understand what you are supposed to do without going around in circles, although the hints are a bit too direct at times.

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Ah yes, somewhat crudely rendered 3D objects. Believe it or not, they are a big draw for me. They harken back to the days of Myst. (okay, not quite *that* crude)

Unfortunately a few obtuse puzzles are still there, but perhaps more due to the interface than the developers’ intentions.I had to look for a walkthrough to see that I was supposed to make a fishing magnet in the garage, because the cursor didn’t help at all. At one point, I just started clicking the screen at random until I got it to do what I wanted. Another big annoyance is a point where you need to rearrange a series of short clips. And in general, there is a lot of scenes with rubble to move around, which honestly shouldn’t count as puzzles. These feel like influences from the HOG genre. Overall though, I feel the general experience is improved, and a good mix of old adventures and new HOGs.

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This style almost looks like a screenshot straight out of an hidden objects game.

The visuals have been modified in several ways. While of course they are higher quality (1024×768 instead of 800×600, and more detailed) the general look is not as dark as before. I don’t mind myself – Dark Fall was one of the most illuminated horror games around, and it’s still got one of my favorite art directions, while its much darker sequels weren’t as good. And who can forget the original Alone in the Dark with its pastel colors? So I’m not that bothered. Still, I can’t help but think that it’s a bit too colorful at times. But hey, you get to enjoy the nice scenery, at least. And of course the voice acting was bad as always, which is just what I wanted.

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The day again, at last! Now to call a taxi, and hope it’s not being driven by a skeleton in diguise.

In the end, Barrow Hill: The Dark Path is a pretty good effort. While it feels modernized, it doesn’t stray from its roots too far, and its improvements for the genre are many. Some may say it was made a bit too easy, though, and that’s something to think about for future games.

Speaking of future games… will Bracken Tor ever come out? I’ve been wondering since 2010 at least, but I’m a bit more hopeful now. Dark Path contains a few audio and visual teasers. Also, many might not remember Wychwood Hollow, another game that was announced a long time ago, as far back as 2011. I remember the early trailer and shots, and it really looks like the project eventually evolved into The Dark Path instead. Chances are, Bracken Tor could end up like that too. Something to wait for?

15 Great Games: The Lost Crown (2008)

The Lost Crown

For the uninitiated, the new millennium has seen a good number of horror adventure game releases by small developers. Dark Fall might be one of the most famous, but others like Scratches and Darkness Within have also received some attention, in their own small way. My favorite of the bunch however has to be The Lost Crown, for ways that are difficult to explain: but let me try.

TLC makes a few concessions to the author’s previous games series: unlike the Dark Fall games, it’s played in third person. 2D backgrounds and 3D characters are nothing new, though seeing them again in 2008 might catch the eye, especially the woody character models. But the backgrounds are a lovely representation of southern England, and some of the most impressive I’ve seen in any adventure games. While I’m a fan of the first-person perspective like in Myst, it probably would have made it impossible to have some of these amazing vistas.

The game is almost entirely in black and white, but if that sounds too drab, just know you will find colors in some unexpected places.
The game is almost entirely in black and white, but if that sounds too drab, just know you will find colors in some unexpected places.

The design is also pretty Lucasartsian – expect to go around a lot, talk to many people, get a bunch of inventory items… the usual, really. So what really holds the game together is the atmosphere. As far as creepy adventures go, this might be one of the creepiest. Sure, you were already hunting for ghosts in other games before, but The Lost Crown really makes you wary of them. They appear very rarely, so when they do, it’s quite a moment. Some situations are genuinely unsettling, like exploring a cemetery through a night-vision camera.

I should point out, also, that the characters and story are very interesting too. The direction is not clear in the beginning, but things start to unfold soon, and you’ll get to learn a lot about the town of Saxon and the misteries it holds. This is also helped by the good length of the game: it’s longer than many adventures, and will take you a long while to complete. It’s quite the ride, and somehow it never lets go. It’s worth noting that the slow walking speed might have something to do with it, however.

Hello there. Fancy meeting you in a church. I'm not even alone here, maybe I'll introduce you to that priest over there.
Hello there. Fancy meeting you in a church. I’m not even alone here, maybe I’ll introduce you to that priest over there.

The puzzles tend to be always quite logical, though there are some more annoying ones in the middle of the game. If possible, I’d suggest playing with the hints website at arm’s length. Sure, it’s better to do things yourself, but getting stuck in a game that is all about the atmosphere and discovery is not very fun. Accept these shortcomings and The Lost Crown will reveal itself as a sprawling, captivating and downright creepy adventure game.

Playing today: PC only, but it’s a relatively recent game. Even the DVD version, which is not difficult to find, will run just fine on any modern system. Take a look at the Steam release however. It is the same game, but it contains a few very welcome improvements, such as the ability to double-click on exits to skip the walking animations and skipping dialogue, which will make the game even more welcoming. And of course the usual stuff like achievements and trading cards. You can’t go wrong either way, but the Steam version is the definitive one, if you don’t mind the DRM (for the record, the disc version comes with a serial key).