Tag Archives: retrogaming

My little SiS (6326) can’t be this fast

I remember when I first tried the SiS 6326. My first thought was something along the lines of “what the hell is this piece of crap?”. A few months later, I have to revise my opinion, if only somewhat.

Resident Evil doesn’t seem to like the old 6326 much. This is, however, a masterpiece of pop-art that should be cherished. Perhaps in a modern art museum.

One thing I should mention, is that my card is merely a C3 revision. From what I can gather, the original C1 model was terrible. And from my tests, the C3 is not that much of an improvement. Games will occasionally show warped polygons, and in general, texture perspective correction is botched to the point of not working, at least in some of the titles in my benchmark suite. 2D elements seem to have trouble displaying correctly. Texture resolution is often abysmal (the card’s paltry 4MB and PCI connector don’t help). Mipmapping apparently turns on and off at random. And the lack of OpenGL is just icing on the sewage cake, not that the 6326 would be able to run Quake 2 or even GLQuake decently, even if it were supported. Mind, the newest drivers even say that an ICD OpenGL is included… but I haven’t managed to run anything on it.

Crank that Blood 2 all the way up to 640×480. The SiS can run it. In low details, of course. If you want proper lighting, then you gotta go down to 512×384… and possibly 400×300.

So it doesn’t sound great today, but as I tried using it a bit more, and considering the circumstances, there’s something to like too. Image quality is actually okay for a cheap 1997 card – there was far worse around, usually for a higher price. A common Virge might look generally better, but it also runs slower, and was more expensive anyway. And it should be mentioned that a later C5 revision solved most of the quality issues of the 6326, making it far more attractive. If it had come out earlier, it would have been even better… but you can’t have everything.

Rogue Squadron doesn’t support anything lower than 640×480, so you get a choppy framerate, no two ways around it. But it’s playable, and the Nintendo 64 version wasn’t very smooth either. For a 1998 game on a 1997 budget card, I’d call it good enough.

A basic Voodoo 1 was another world, of course. But it was also $300. Bragging to your console friends was a somewhat expensive proposition then. The SiS 6326 though, that was just $50… and for that, you got a decent card that could accelerate games to 16 bits fairly smoothly up to 400×300 or even 512×384. Of course it supported higher as well, but people weren’t fans of slideshows even back then.

If I can find it cheap (and it should be easy, since these cards sold quite a lot), I would like to get my hands on the AGP C5 revision, to see how it compares. I also wonder how it compares to a Nintendo 64… maybe I will try a few conversions.

Shining Wisdom: And it wasn’t even a CD-i game

I consider myself pretty tolerant when it comes to bad games. I’ll give just about anything a fair chance, and sometimes I’ll even like it. Why, even Tales of the Tempest didn’t faze me (not too much anyway). It takes a very special kind of bad to get my teeth grinding. Unfortunately, that kind of stuff happens too.

You know how JRPG July is a thing in some sites? I didn’t, but anyway, I thought I’d join the fun. Me being me, I couldn’t just choose one of those popular games everyone else will play. Final Fantasy 12 Remastered? Sorry, even a properly inverted camera won’t be enough to get me back into that borefest. Of course it had to be something old and obscure. Of course it had to be… Shining Wisdom!

Shining Wisdom, or How I learned that forgotten games are forgotten for a reason

A Megadrive game quickly converted onto the Saturn, this one is less of a strategy RPG or dungeon crawler, and more like a Zelda clone. That should be good news. It’s kinda hard to mess up a Zelda clone. Worst case scenario, it will just be boring. Right? Not so fast. I don’t know how Sega did it, but Shining Wisdom is the worst Zelda clone I’ve ever played, by far. I don’t know about the CD-i Zelda games, but I can’t imagine them being worse than this.

It starts like Chrono Trigger. It’s nothing like Chrono Trigger.

I could talk about what makes this game so terrible for hours on end, but let’s make it quicker and list what does work:

  • the cover art is not too bad, in a sort of anime-ish Castlevania way

Well, that’s it. Everything else is terrible. From controls, to hit detection, graphics and sound, even the music will make your ears bleed after a few seconds (and I have even higher tolerance for bad music than bad games). I wasn’t really following the story because the large areas without any sort of map functions suck the fun out of talking to NPCs immediately, especially in the castle, but what little I’ve seen seemed pretty uninteresting. The early 3D era character design is possibly even worse, coming from a time when a sphere on top of a cube could pass for a human torso.

Lifeless Puppets: The Movie: The Game

Some games might be bad, but almost everything leaves you at least something by the end. It could be a memory of the only good part of the game, maybe one memorable tune, or one interesting character.  Perhaps even the emotional load of a disappointing sequel, such as Mansion of Hidden Souls 2. I’m sorry to report that Shining Wisdom gives you absolutely nothing. It’s terrible all around, and I can’t find any redeeming quality whatsoever. As a Megadrive game, it could have perhaps been at least a technological showcase, but as a Saturn title, it fails even on that front. And since I had no expectations, it couldn’t even let me down.

I’m sorry, duck princess, I’ll never know how your story ends. And I don’t care to know.

A bad game that is just bad. There is nothing sadder in life. Not even Tales of the Tempest.

I suppose I should look for something else, but honestly, I’m probably just going to replay Quake 2. Why not, my JRPG July will be the “Jump and Run with Pistols and Guns” July.

Bringing a knife to a gun fight

So here’s a story. Back in 2001, an interesting game called American McGee’s Alice came out. It was weird for a couple reasons. First, I believe it was one of the earliest examples of a director using his name in the title of his game, though I might be wrong here. But also, it was a re-imagining of a beloved children’s story, this time with dark and grotesque imagery and more than a bit of violence.

Alice does have a weird tendency to sound completely detached at one point, and break down crying one second later. Maybe it comes with the dyed hair.
I think this is the level in Mario 64 where I almost gave up on getting all 120 stars. I still got them in the end, though.

It was a cult hit, I believe, but not much more. Certainly not many people remembered it by the next year. Anyway, 7-8 years later Disney had a similar idea for their movies, and made a sort of dark fable out of Alice in Wonderland, of course starring Johnny Depp because back then he was still the hottest thing ever. It went on to become a worldwide success, so it’s no surprise that some videogame publisher would try and bank on it. Enter EA, who could have just made a movie tie-in… but instead, decided to resurrect an old, unrelated game that just coincidentally had a similar idea years earlier. And so comes Alice Madness Returns, and the circle is closed.

I dig Goth Alice’s look in Madness Returns, but she really needs to lay down the eyeliner.

Even better, they included the original game with the sequel. At least, on consoles. At least, as paid DLC. But now it’s free DLC! Funny how that works. Since Madness Returns was put on sale and also joined the backward compatibility program, I could finally play American McGee’s Alice, which I had missed upon release, and also take a bunch of screenshots.

There’s a whiff of Shadow Man to the enviroments and design, although encased in a fairly old-looking modification of the Quake 3 engine. I swear Quake 3 was much more pleasing to the eye, this is closer to Quake 2 in looks.

Not much to say about the game itself. Some interesting ideas, and the design is definitely disturbing at times, but the platforming and combat are both mediocre. In an action-platforming game you’d guess that could be a problem, and it is. Still, worth playing through, if only to see what happens. The Disney 2010 movie took a different direction for sure. At least I’m ready for Madness Returns now… though I might not start immediately. Quantum break has been waiting for too long.

Remember when there was just one Alien?

Juggling several games at once, like I constantly do, means you have more chances of rediscovering stuff you bought (or maybe even got for free) ages ago and never played. One such game is Alien Versus Predator, one of the most famous among those featuring the Xenomorphs – and the Predators too, of course, but there are many more games about the Alien whereas the hunter creature never really got anything aside maybe from Predator: Concrete Jungle (another game currently in my waitlist). And as it usually happens with very old stuff, 18 years old in this case, what you discover is not quite the same as people saw it upon release.

The Marine campaign would be much more tense, if it weren’t almost arcade in nature.

They said it was scary. Well, people also found The Exorcist horrifying in 1973, so I guess standards do change. But even so, I was never really afraid of peeking behind a corner. Perhaps the biggest problem was, even if an Alien had been hiding there, I could just blast its face full of lead. At worst its acidic blood splurts would take out maybe 15% of my armor, top. Not so scary then, is it? Enemies respawn, which means you can never truly feel safe, but it’s also easy to predict where the developers are going to spawn an Alien, so you are always ready. Except for the face-huggers. Those things were really annoying.

The Predator campaign is a bit like playing Crysis in 1999: you get the coolest weapons, a cloaking ability, your energy recharges with time, and the graphics hurt your eyes.

This was arguably a problem with old games in general. Can’t really see people getting scared by Alone in the Dark or Resident Evil today, aside from a couple of scripted sequences – which brings me to my point: scripting. In the end, is it only possible to do horror in games by carefully constructing everything in advance? The success of Outlast, so hollywoodian in nature, would make you think so. Even earlier games like Penumbra and Amnesia, though less restrictive, still relied for the most part on scripted events. Heck, the most memorable parts of the aforementioned fathers of survival horror are still the scripted scenes, like the dog monster breaking into the house from the window in RE1, or… the dog monster breaking into the house from the window in AITD. Yeah, I can see a pattern here.

The Alien campaign sometimes reminds you of the more colorful Rayman 2.

I can’t think of many ways of doing horror without carefully setting up a specific scene for the player to stumble upon. Certain titles like Silent Hill and Forbidden Siren were a bit creepier all around, but even in those games you are on the edge of your seat precisely because you don’t know when the next scripted scare will come up. I so, however, remember the NY Tenements level in Shadow Man, where somehow I was scared all the way through, even though nothing happened. Now I know this, it’s not scary anymore, but the first time it worked well. Is it possible then, to do horror without scripting? Perhaps so, but just like scripted horror, it would lack replayability.

I don’t actually remember what I wanted to say anymore, so nevermind. As it stands, AVP1 was fun but flawed, and certtainly not that scary. From what I know, when Monolith developed AVP2, they dropped the randomized nature in favor of the Valve-esque route of scripted events. So maybe it will be more horror in nature. I’ll know soon: the game itself is not available on any download service, but I still have the disc, and it seems to work fairly well on Windows 10 too. We’ll see if a scripted scare is more effective than Aliens coming out of the goddamn walls.

Terminal Velocity Review

Apparently, Saturday was “Review A Great Game Day”. Never heard of this before. But I’m not one to let these things slide. So let’s see… it’s still Saturday in Honolulu. I guess it still counts, right? Right. Let’s try and review something a bit less famous than usual.

This is actually quite representative of the game itself. What a rare sight.
This is actually quite representative of the game itself. What a rare sight.

Terminal Velocity was developed by Terminal Reality (can’t be a coincidence…) and published in 1995 by 3DRealms, back when they were still relevant. You probably remember the developers for pearls such as Kinect Star Wars and that Walking Dead shooter, but ages ago, they were also fairly big in the early Windows scene, making games that were at least trying to take advantage of the newly-fangled Direct3D technology, including Hellbender and Monster Truck Madness. I pity them, because by all accounts, early Direct3D was terrible.

Terminal Velocity is, for my money, still their best game (though admittedly I haven’t played all of them: I heard pretty good things about Nocturne). In case you couldn’t notice from the cover, it’s a space shooter, a very common genre in the mid 90’s, thanks no doubt to the amazing success of Descent, which had spawned several clones. But TV breaks the mold somewhat by letting you fly on large planets, making it less claustrophobic and far less nausea-inducing. Interestingly, you can still fly your ship in complete freedom, so it’s actually possible to go far above the clouds and near the atmosphere even. Good luck spotting your targets from there.

There are three camera modes: first-person, third-person, and a weird fixed camera third-person mode that is near unplayable but probably very cool for screenshots.

The structure is fairly similar, if somewhat repetitive: you get objectives to complete (usually flying to a spot and then destroying a target base), weapons to collect (lasers, missiles, your typical arsenal), enemies to kill, bosses to survive. Since everything takes place on open terrain, you are usually free to take the route you want, and exploration is even encouraged by hiding powerful weapons off the beaten path. You’ll also get attacked from all directions, so keep wary. Sometimes things can get overwhelming.

In order to retain a sense of purpose, you are often asked to fly through underground tunnels. These are presented as point A-to-B voyages where you need to dodge doors and destroy ships who just love ramming through your own. There’s a vague sense of Descent in these 3D metal tunnels, but with completely straight paths, it’s a bit more like a rollercoaster. For extra fun, try using the afterburner in there, and see if you can survive.

With the small radar pretty much useless, you’ll quickly learn to play with the super-imposed radar constantly on. Turok didn’t come first, guys.

The controls work fairly well for such an early game, so you shouldn’t have too much trouble with that. Even the graphics are quite pleasant for their time, once you get used to the giant pixels. Since you know I’m a 3D accelerators aficionado, I’ll also tell you the only “accelerated” version was made available for S3 Virge cards. Of course, in exchange for texture filtering, it actually runs slower than the base version. Don’t cry. Also, as was standard procedure for the era, there are not many music tracks in the game and the few available ones are repeated very often. Still, they are quite catchy, so I’m not complaining all that much. There are also vague hints of a story somewhere in there, presented at the start of each mission, if you can be bothered. I don’t think the developers cared that much either though.

A tunnel. It looks better in motion, I swear. The pixels aren’t attacking your eyes like thousands of small knives, for example.

There’s the distinct feeling that terminal Velocity could have been an all-time great, but it’s somewhat held back by its repetitive structure. With nine different planets and three stages on each, it would have taken a lot of variety to keep players interested throughout, but the game just doesn’t have that. The different tilesets are nice to look at, including giant volcanos places (maybe a Venus expy?) and snowy landscapes (before Skyrim made them all the rage), but I don’t know how many people will have the willpower to see it through to the bitter end – and bitter it was, if I recall some of the later bosses were an utter pain, made worse by the lack of saving during missions.

So, the game was repetitive, much like my reviews. That shouldn’t deter you too much though, because while one might not last long enough to see the ending, at least there’s fun to be had for quite a while. Besides, most 90’s games didn’t even have a meaningful ending, so what do you care? Get on that ship and fly to your heart’s content. The game is easily available on GOG and Steam. Did you know there’s even an Android version? Never tried it, but just to be sure, I’d steer clear of it. Besides, I still have the old disc. Fun times.

Leo’s Toy Store

By now everyone knows, I’m certain, that 428 is going to be localized by Spike Chunsoft next year. This event, the magnitude of which has been unseen in decades, has consequences twofold for me. First, it gives me a chance to experience the sequel to my personal game of 2016 (yes, Machi came out in 1998, I know). Most importantly, it means I can drop my plans to use the on-screen translator on the emulated Wii version.

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On the left, the ultimate villain of Machi (probably not featuring in 428)

I’m somewhat worried, though. I can’t help but think that the sheer amount of effort required to play Machi while translating on the fly, trying to interpret those words the OCR couldn’t recognize, and overall spending a very long time with the game, has been instrumental in my enjoyment of it. Now that 428 is going to be easily available, that crucial element is going be missing. Perhaps… perhaps I should translate it myself again, instead?

Another thing that required a lot of effort was War and Peace, which I finally finished a few days ago. Started in December, finished in March… not bad. At least now I know that Tolstoy was totally a Napoleon hater, and Kutuzov fanboy. The first half was really good, and one of the best written books I’ve ever read. But the second half, when the war starts, quickly goes downhill. Even the writing falls in quality, with Tolstoy often repeating himself five or six times in the same paragraph. It doesn’t even feel like I was reading the same book. Too bad, because it had started so well. Oh well, the hype can’t always be real.

Of course, there’s a new book in the pipeline already. Did you doubt it?

Memory Goes Here, Performance Goes There

Another failure? At least an interesting one, this time.

20170216_194151
A whole 8MB on a single stick. Only in 1998, folks.

Just a few days ago, I found a cheap 8MB SGRAM expansion for the Matrox G200 series. Yes, it’s a memory expansion for real this time. It was supposed to bring my G250 all the way up to 16MB. In itself, it’s already a useless experiment – the G400 32MB has more memory, is faster in everything, and has literally the same compatibility (including the same issues). While I was sure it wouldn’t make any difference in lower resolutions, I was thinking that perhaps you could see an effect once the local memory was entirely filled up by the framebuffer.

What I didn’t know, was that the memory expansion would actually decrease the default memory and core clocks on the card.

g250bench1
You don’t have to worry about higher resolutions if your monitor is crap.

I said in the past, that my G250 seems a bit different from the specs originally mentioned on Wikipedia: the core runs at 105mhz core, and the memory at 140mhz. That’s pretty high for its time, but I tested the veridicity of Powerstrip’s claims by running a few games and noticing that framerates scaled almost linearly against the G200A (which runs at 84/112mhz). It doesn’t even seem like an anomalous overclock, since scores stay up no matter how long I keep the tests running, and there are no artifacts in sight.

But after installing the memory daughterboard, suddenly I found the clocks going down to 90/120mhz. Attempting to overclock the card all the way up to the original values produced slight artifacts, so I didn’t make any further attempts. And sure enough, testing the card showed a sizeable decrease over the original framerates. The Forsaken test is particularly telling: the framerate matches the core clocks almost entirely, and shows that, at least on a P3-450mhz, the game is completely bound by the graphics card.

20170216_194429
The complete set. Now with automatic downclocking.

I made two mistakes: I thought there would be no difference at lower resolutions, but there was. And also, I thought there might be a difference at high resolutions, but it didn’t quite turn out. Even with something like 1024x768x32 in Incoming, which is supposed to fill the framebuffer almost entirely, the framerate delta is still effectively the same. 3DMark 99 does show a slight proportional increase when running at 1280×1024, but the difference is pretty small. I suppose the G200 series was really good at AGP texturing. It had DiME support, like the i740, whereas many AGP cards of the era stopped at DMA.

So what happened? Well, I have a theory. The expansion module was made for the old G200, which only ran at 84/112mhz (just like the later G200A die shrink). So they didn’t bother making memory chips that could run much faster than that, since they weren’t expecting people to clock the card any higher – after all, the G200 wasn’t even quite a gamer’s card to begin with. Therefore, since the G200 seems to always run with a 3:4 ratio between the core and memory, if you add slower memories, the core will go down too. Bummer, uh?

20170215_200400
Thank god my paycheck came in just a few days ago.

So that was an interesting experiment, but it could have gone better. Lately, all of my experiments haven’t gone so well, perhaps it’s a sign that my benchmarking days are over? Time will tell. At least the rest of my haul from yesterday wasn’t bad, as you can see. I expect to start Barrow Hill pretty soon, perhaps in the weekend (still playing Claw)… while the Zork book will have to wait until War and Peace is finished, which might take a little while.

Oh, and the SiS 6326 is a C3 revision with just 4MB of memory. Even worse than expected. I’ve never seen such horrible texturing perspective issues. Another one for the shelf.