Tag Archives: gaming

Bringing a knife to a gun fight

So here’s a story. Back in 2001, an interesting game called American McGee’s Alice came out. It was weird for a couple reasons. First, I believe it was one of the earliest examples of a director using his name in the title of his game, though I might be wrong here. But also, it was a re-imagining of a beloved children’s story, this time with dark and grotesque imagery and more than a bit of violence.

Alice does have a weird tendency to sound completely detached at one point, and break down crying one second later. Maybe it comes with the dyed hair.
I think this is the level in Mario 64 where I almost gave up on getting all 120 stars. I still got them in the end, though.

It was a cult hit, I believe, but not much more. Certainly not many people remembered it by the next year. Anyway, 7-8 years later Disney had a similar idea for their movies, and made a sort of dark fable out of Alice in Wonderland, of course starring Johnny Depp because back then he was still the hottest thing ever. It went on to become a worldwide success, so it’s no surprise that some videogame publisher would try and bank on it. Enter EA, who could have just made a movie tie-in… but instead, decided to resurrect an old, unrelated game that just coincidentally had a similar idea years earlier. And so comes Alice Madness Returns, and the circle is closed.

I dig Goth Alice’s look in Madness Returns, but she really needs to lay down the eyeliner.

Even better, they included the original game with the sequel. At least, on consoles. At least, as paid DLC. But now it’s free DLC! Funny how that works. Since Madness Returns was put on sale and also joined the backward compatibility program, I could finally play American McGee’s Alice, which I had missed upon release, and also take a bunch of screenshots.

There’s a whiff of Shadow Man to the enviroments and design, although encased in a fairly old-looking modification of the Quake 3 engine. I swear Quake 3 was much more pleasing to the eye, this is closer to Quake 2 in looks.

Not much to say about the game itself. Some interesting ideas, and the design is definitely disturbing at times, but the platforming and combat are both mediocre. In an action-platforming game you’d guess that could be a problem, and it is. Still, worth playing through, if only to see what happens. The Disney 2010 movie took a different direction for sure. At least I’m ready for Madness Returns now… though I might not start immediately. Quantum break has been waiting for too long.

Breaking the hours barrier

I just noticed that I must have spent more than 200 hours playing Destiny. That sounds like a lot of time for one game, but I did come close with some other titles too. The Binding of Isaac is roughly 180 hours, same for Diablo 3, Dark Souls 2 is probably more than that between all of my characters, and even though Morrowind and Baroque have no counter, I have a feeling I must have spent more than 200 hours in those too.

The counter actually says 190 hours, but it doesn’t count the time spent in cities and in orbit. And believe me, that was a whole lot of time spent mulling over legendary items.

While playing one game for so long is quite rare for me, I know that some people have played other games far, far longer.  I’m always amazed whenever someone comes up with an 800 hours savedata for Disgaea or whatever. I mean, I have spent the last two months playing almost exclusively Destiny (granted I didn’t have a lot of free time in the past two months… or in the next month) and I only got to 200 hours. And that was on top of the existing 70-80 hours I had accumulated during the launch period. Just how long do you have to play to reach 800 hours? (… well, I guess you’d have to play 800 hours)

You disturbed the remains (stealth Destiny reference). And yes, of course the various Serious Sam games have also been played way too many times.

If you have played a certain game for more hours than you’d care to admit, how did you do it? Did you keep playing even through the boring parts, or were you actually never bored? I can’t possibly imagine playing a game for that long without getting tired at some point. I’m doing fine in Destiny now, but of course repetitiveness is setting in.. and now I’m Light 398, it won’t be long before I get to 400 and lose the drive to grind in the first place.

I just lack that kind of focus. Then again, I play more games than the average person. Maybe I lose interest too quickly, and then switch to the next game. Well, that’s fine too. But maybe one day I’ll find that perfect game. The one that grabs and just doesn’t let go. That game to marry, so to speak. Not that there’s anything creepy about marrying a game, no sir.

Remember when there was just one Alien?

Juggling several games at once, like I constantly do, means you have more chances of rediscovering stuff you bought (or maybe even got for free) ages ago and never played. One such game is Alien Versus Predator, one of the most famous among those featuring the Xenomorphs – and the Predators too, of course, but there are many more games about the Alien whereas the hunter creature never really got anything aside maybe from Predator: Concrete Jungle (another game currently in my waitlist). And as it usually happens with very old stuff, 18 years old in this case, what you discover is not quite the same as people saw it upon release.

The Marine campaign would be much more tense, if it weren’t almost arcade in nature.

They said it was scary. Well, people also found The Exorcist horrifying in 1973, so I guess standards do change. But even so, I was never really afraid of peeking behind a corner. Perhaps the biggest problem was, even if an Alien had been hiding there, I could just blast its face full of lead. At worst its acidic blood splurts would take out maybe 15% of my armor, top. Not so scary then, is it? Enemies respawn, which means you can never truly feel safe, but it’s also easy to predict where the developers are going to spawn an Alien, so you are always ready. Except for the face-huggers. Those things were really annoying.

The Predator campaign is a bit like playing Crysis in 1999: you get the coolest weapons, a cloaking ability, your energy recharges with time, and the graphics hurt your eyes.

This was arguably a problem with old games in general. Can’t really see people getting scared by Alone in the Dark or Resident Evil today, aside from a couple of scripted sequences – which brings me to my point: scripting. In the end, is it only possible to do horror in games by carefully constructing everything in advance? The success of Outlast, so hollywoodian in nature, would make you think so. Even earlier games like Penumbra and Amnesia, though less restrictive, still relied for the most part on scripted events. Heck, the most memorable parts of the aforementioned fathers of survival horror are still the scripted scenes, like the dog monster breaking into the house from the window in RE1, or… the dog monster breaking into the house from the window in AITD. Yeah, I can see a pattern here.

The Alien campaign sometimes reminds you of the more colorful Rayman 2.

I can’t think of many ways of doing horror without carefully setting up a specific scene for the player to stumble upon. Certain titles like Silent Hill and Forbidden Siren were a bit creepier all around, but even in those games you are on the edge of your seat precisely because you don’t know when the next scripted scare will come up. I so, however, remember the NY Tenements level in Shadow Man, where somehow I was scared all the way through, even though nothing happened. Now I know this, it’s not scary anymore, but the first time it worked well. Is it possible then, to do horror without scripting? Perhaps so, but just like scripted horror, it would lack replayability.

I don’t actually remember what I wanted to say anymore, so nevermind. As it stands, AVP1 was fun but flawed, and certtainly not that scary. From what I know, when Monolith developed AVP2, they dropped the randomized nature in favor of the Valve-esque route of scripted events. So maybe it will be more horror in nature. I’ll know soon: the game itself is not available on any download service, but I still have the disc, and it seems to work fairly well on Windows 10 too. We’ll see if a scripted scare is more effective than Aliens coming out of the goddamn walls.

Serious Sam Fusion 2017 beta: Fish’n’Fries

If you own Serious Sam HD: The First Encounter, you can now download the Serious Sam Fusion 2017 beta on Steam. What is it? Well, apparently some kind of central hub for all things Serious Sam, allowing access to the first up to the third game, presumably including the DLC chapters, and even SS4 whenever it comes out (so far it only supports TFE HD). It features slightly revamped graphics, easier access to all games from one place (guess the Steam client wasn’t easy enough), and probably new leaderboards. That last bit is my current problem.

Perhaps you don’t know, but Serious Sam HD works a bit differently from other games. Your leaderboard score is simply the sum of your scores from every level… and I mean all levels, including extra ones: so if you start TSE HD, and have the Fusion DLC installed, you can get a higher score by playing through the TFE episodes and two demo levels as well, not to mention the Legend of the Beast DLC chapter. It’s kind of pay to win, at least when it comes to leaderboards. But if Fusion 2017 is going to have unified leaderboards for all games, that means in order to keep my spot, I’ll have to replay every game, one by one, and get a high score in all of them!

Oh well, back again with Serious +  No Health + No Armor + No Powerups… 66x multiplier, here I come.

SS HD Fusion 2017: level 1
I’d play on Mental for 76x, but it has less enemies. I noticed you actually tend to get lower scores.

The graphics look a bit more natural, though also a bit less rich… I wonder if it was a side effect of having to make the game work smoothly in VR mode. I kinda like the new look. Currently it has a few bugs and also a few fixes. A big one is the werebulls behavior, which is a bit too aggressive. Seriously, right now whenever I meet one of them, I just bombard them from a distance, because dodging them has become near impossible. One fix, which was a long time coming but still disappointing, is the revolvers reload glitch: now, if you switch to a different weapons, the revolvers won’t be automatically reloaded. I’ll have to plan for that change during big fights.

But most importantly, they actually fixed the fishes’ behavior! In the original game and even in the HD remake, fishes were everyone’s nightmare because their physics were completely broken. They were supposed to be able to electrocute you from a short range, but in actuality, you could be hit from the other side of the arena, and their attacks hurt like hell. As if that weren’t bad enough, they could even chase you out of the water! An absolute nightmare. In Fusion 2017, they finally act like they should: much shorter range, and not nearly as aggressive. I can finally explore the waters in peace.

Now, let’s hope they fix the werebulls soon too, because in their current state they could make later levels near unplayable. And as Sam would say, that’s a load of bull.

Barrow Hill: The Dark Path – Night of the Offering Redux

I’ve made no secret of my love for niche horror adventures. I don’t know what it is that attracts me to them – maybe the obtuse puzzles, or the totally corny voice acting, or the nice art that still relies on point and click screens. I’ve been playing these things since the original Dark Fall. Although, it wasn’t always such a great time: Dark Fall was a bit too complicated. Rhiannon was a screen-hunting mess (in a real nice setting though). The Lost Crown was really good, but perhaps too long. Barrow Hill was one of the most interesting titles, but suffered from a pretty hard big puzzle near the end. So how does its sequel fare?

(spoilers ahead)

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“I thought I was rid of Emma Harry and her crazy spirits forever. But now I know I must go… BACK TO THE HILL!” *theme music*

The plot is not too different from the first game. It’s still the Equinox, some kids are still stupid enough to go around meddling with vengeful spirits, and you gotta save everyone. While it does feel like a retread, even down to the puzzles progression, enough has been changed to make the experience feel fairly fresh.

tdp2
Oh, looks like the victims from the first game got some mourning from their families. Finally someone who cares about disappeared NPCs.

The big problem in horror adventures is often how difficult and obtuse the puzzles are. Finding some of the ingredients in Barrow Hill was outright devilish. Dark Path tries to solve this issue by hinting at solutions a bit more heavily, especially if you enable item descriptions from the options. The three big puzzles to end the game – find the kids’ personal items to free them, find the metals to destroy the circle, and get some substitute items to replace Baibin’s – are almost all fairly obvious. This does make the game a lot less frustrating as you are generally able to understand what you are supposed to do without going around in circles, although the hints are a bit too direct at times.

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Ah yes, somewhat crudely rendered 3D objects. Believe it or not, they are a big draw for me. They harken back to the days of Myst. (okay, not quite *that* crude)

Unfortunately a few obtuse puzzles are still there, but perhaps more due to the interface than the developers’ intentions.I had to look for a walkthrough to see that I was supposed to make a fishing magnet in the garage, because the cursor didn’t help at all. At one point, I just started clicking the screen at random until I got it to do what I wanted. Another big annoyance is a point where you need to rearrange a series of short clips. And in general, there is a lot of scenes with rubble to move around, which honestly shouldn’t count as puzzles. These feel like influences from the HOG genre. Overall though, I feel the general experience is improved, and a good mix of old adventures and new HOGs.

tdp5
This style almost looks like a screenshot straight out of an hidden objects game.

The visuals have been modified in several ways. While of course they are higher quality (1024×768 instead of 800×600, and more detailed) the general look is not as dark as before. I don’t mind myself – Dark Fall was one of the most illuminated horror games around, and it’s still got one of my favorite art directions, while its much darker sequels weren’t as good. And who can forget the original Alone in the Dark with its pastel colors? So I’m not that bothered. Still, I can’t help but think that it’s a bit too colorful at times. But hey, you get to enjoy the nice scenery, at least. And of course the voice acting was bad as always, which is just what I wanted.

tdp7
The day again, at last! Now to call a taxi, and hope it’s not being driven by a skeleton in diguise.

In the end, Barrow Hill: The Dark Path is a pretty good effort. While it feels modernized, it doesn’t stray from its roots too far, and its improvements for the genre are many. Some may say it was made a bit too easy, though, and that’s something to think about for future games.

Speaking of future games… will Bracken Tor ever come out? I’ve been wondering since 2010 at least, but I’m a bit more hopeful now. Dark Path contains a few audio and visual teasers. Also, many might not remember Wychwood Hollow, another game that was announced a long time ago, as far back as 2011. I remember the early trailer and shots, and it really looks like the project eventually evolved into The Dark Path instead. Chances are, Bracken Tor could end up like that too. Something to wait for?

Memory Goes Here, Performance Goes There

Another failure? At least an interesting one, this time.

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A whole 8MB on a single stick. Only in 1998, folks.

Just a few days ago, I found a cheap 8MB SGRAM expansion for the Matrox G200 series. Yes, it’s a memory expansion for real this time. It was supposed to bring my G250 all the way up to 16MB. In itself, it’s already a useless experiment – the G400 32MB has more memory, is faster in everything, and has literally the same compatibility (including the same issues). While I was sure it wouldn’t make any difference in lower resolutions, I was thinking that perhaps you could see an effect once the local memory was entirely filled up by the framebuffer.

What I didn’t know, was that the memory expansion would actually decrease the default memory and core clocks on the card.

g250bench1
You don’t have to worry about higher resolutions if your monitor is crap.

I said in the past, that my G250 seems a bit different from the specs originally mentioned on Wikipedia: the core runs at 105mhz core, and the memory at 140mhz. That’s pretty high for its time, but I tested the veridicity of Powerstrip’s claims by running a few games and noticing that framerates scaled almost linearly against the G200A (which runs at 84/112mhz). It doesn’t even seem like an anomalous overclock, since scores stay up no matter how long I keep the tests running, and there are no artifacts in sight.

But after installing the memory daughterboard, suddenly I found the clocks going down to 90/120mhz. Attempting to overclock the card all the way up to the original values produced slight artifacts, so I didn’t make any further attempts. And sure enough, testing the card showed a sizeable decrease over the original framerates. The Forsaken test is particularly telling: the framerate matches the core clocks almost entirely, and shows that, at least on a P3-450mhz, the game is completely bound by the graphics card.

20170216_194429
The complete set. Now with automatic downclocking.

I made two mistakes: I thought there would be no difference at lower resolutions, but there was. And also, I thought there might be a difference at high resolutions, but it didn’t quite turn out. Even with something like 1024x768x32 in Incoming, which is supposed to fill the framebuffer almost entirely, the framerate delta is still effectively the same. 3DMark 99 does show a slight proportional increase when running at 1280×1024, but the difference is pretty small. I suppose the G200 series was really good at AGP texturing. It had DiME support, like the i740, whereas many AGP cards of the era stopped at DMA.

So what happened? Well, I have a theory. The expansion module was made for the old G200, which only ran at 84/112mhz (just like the later G200A die shrink). So they didn’t bother making memory chips that could run much faster than that, since they weren’t expecting people to clock the card any higher – after all, the G200 wasn’t even quite a gamer’s card to begin with. Therefore, since the G200 seems to always run with a 3:4 ratio between the core and memory, if you add slower memories, the core will go down too. Bummer, uh?

20170215_200400
Thank god my paycheck came in just a few days ago.

So that was an interesting experiment, but it could have gone better. Lately, all of my experiments haven’t gone so well, perhaps it’s a sign that my benchmarking days are over? Time will tell. At least the rest of my haul from yesterday wasn’t bad, as you can see. I expect to start Barrow Hill pretty soon, perhaps in the weekend (still playing Claw)… while the Zork book will have to wait until War and Peace is finished, which might take a little while.

Oh, and the SiS 6326 is a C3 revision with just 4MB of memory. Even worse than expected. I’ve never seen such horrible texturing perspective issues. Another one for the shelf.

Beyond Good and Bad

Things aren’t always good. 2016, for example, wasn’t good by any stretch of the imagination. Hence, you can’t always talk about good things.I’ll agree that it helps people feel better: “oh, this thing that happened last year was great, totally worth it”. But sometimes you need to take a look at some things that didn’t go as planned. Which leads me to…

Most “Ok Well, That Was A Disappointment” Game of 2016:
The Mansion of Hidden Souls (Saturn, 1994)

mhs2
Never forget.

After all, what else do you call a bad sequel to a fairly good adventure, if not disappointing? The original Mansion of Hidden Souls was the very last game I played in 2015, and a surprisingly good one. I had heard about the sequel, so I didn’t have much hope it was good – but it ended up even worse than I expected. I can’t describe its crappiness in words (because it’s too much), or it’s plot (because it’s beyond description), so why don’t you give it a try?

But after the rain, the sun comes up. And we can’t just focus on the negative. That’s not good for your health. We need some good in life, and the best kind of nice things come from unexpected places.

Most “Wait, This Isn’t As Bad As I Remembered” Game of 2016
Serious Sam 2 (PC, 2005)

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Wait, what happened to all the sand and pyramids? I distinctly remember something that looked like a sphynx at some point.

No, hear me out. I know you thought I hated Serious Sam 2. To be fair, my dislike of the game was based on the first couple levels – which were so bad (and admittedly, so different from the original series) that they put me off playing entirely. Flash forward several years later, and I decide to give it a better chance. And what do you know? After the crappy beginning, it gets actually good. Sure, it’s still my least favorite in the series, and some sections are still downright annoying. But at least it’s a fun pick-up-and-play title, whoch lets you have fun blasting those damn Kleers with ease, unlike the older games. And some of the cutscenes are genuinely funny. Which reminds me, after the bleakness of SS3, I hope SS4 is a return to form.

There are even things that aren’t quite good or bad. More specifically, they might be the best you could have done within certain limitations. That doesn’t make them necessarily good, but you gotta at least admire the effort, and at least they weren’t as bad as they could have been.

Most “It Should Have Been Crap But It Wasn’t” Game of 2016
Fable: The Journey (Xbox 360, 2012)

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It was a bit like travelling around in Oblivion, if Bethesda suddenly decided to make an on-rail adventure and actually added some charm to its game.

Kinect, in the end, was only good for a few things: music games and on-rail shooters. Fable Journey did have some of the latter, but it sure didn’t have any of the former. And the rest of the story is filled with horse sections. But hey, at least they make you care about the horse. The story might be utterly predictable, but it’s well told. And while you’ll spend half your time fighting the controls, it’s almost worth it in the end. I can’t say it was a game I’d play again, but it was something I always wanted to play for some reason, and it’s already impressive enough that it didn’t disappoint.

As I said before, good and bad is not all there is in the world. In some cases though, you outright don’t care. Perhaps you are bound by a previous decision, an oath if you will. Maybe it’s simply a case of collectionism. It might even be a gift for someone, who died before you could give it to them, hence you are now stuck with it (oh wow, that turned sour pretty fast). Either way, you have to live with it. With some luck, you won’t care.

Most “I Said I Would Buy It So There Was No Choice” Game of 2016
Lego Jurassic World (PC, 2015)

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Now, eventually you do plan to have Lego enviroments in your Lego game series, right?

Me in 2014: okay, I’m not a big fan of Lego games, but if they made one based on Jurassic Park, I’d totally bite
TT Games in 2015: Lego Jurassic World is so coming!
Me in 2015: crap, at least let me wait for a sale…

Ok well. See, it wasn’t bad. Lego games rarely are bad to begin with. But they are pretty much all the same. I’ve played a few, and I didn’t really want to play any more of them. But in the end, I’m glad I did, because I was able to see what kind of progress the series has made since the earlier efforts. To be fair, not even all that much progress… but that’s better than nothing. Let me also go on record and say that, if they make a Lego game based on Predator, I’m buying that too (pretty sure I’m safe this time).

Finally, sometimes… nothing at all matters. Good, bad, promises, expectations… nothing. You play something short just because you need to finish the 52 games in a year challenge.

Most “I Can’t Believe I Played This” Game of 2016
Teddy Floppy-Ear: Mountain Adventure (PC, 2015)

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I regret nothing.

Don’t ask. At least it was fun, okay?